Japanese Cultural Programming

JAS works with many independent presenters and groups and can provide referrals or help arrange programs for schools, communities, libraries, and other organizations. 

Who can request these activities?   Schools, libraries, museums, groups of ten or more, and other organizations may request a presentation, demonstration, or hands-on activity of the options below. 

Is there a fee?  Some performers or groups may be contacted directly and may require a performance fee, negotiated on a case by case basis. For JAS-coordinated programs, JAS appreciates modest donations to cover gratuities. 

See below for descriptions on the cultural outreach offered. 

Go To Request Form

    Budo – Aikido, Judo, & Kendo

Budo are the martial Ways of Japan; arts aimed at sport as well as physical training and the development of aesthetic values consistent with traditional Japanese culture.

Aikido – modern Japanese martial art that practices defending oneself while protecting your opponent from injury.

Judo – modern Japanese martial art with features of throwing and taking down opponents in a gentle manner and immobilizing them.

Kendo – traditional Japanese martial art that uses bamboo swords and protective armor.

Koryu Bugei – for a presentation on a classical Japanese martial art style or system, please contact Dave Lowry at mailto:stlouis.smr@gmail.com

 


 

Calligraphy (Shodō)

Japanese calligraphy is a form of artistic writing of the Japanese language. The calligraphy

program offers individuals a chance to write with a calligraphy brush and sumi ink.


Dance

Request a performance followed by audience participation:

        Bon Odori - a style of group dancing performed at Obon festivals during summer        

        Okinawa Eisa - folk dancing that originates from the Okinawan islands of Japan    

 

 

Haiku

This time honored form of Japanese poetry consists of 3 unrhymed lines of five-seven-five

syllables or sounds. Become skilled at crafting your very own haiku with this interactive

lesson.


Japan In A Suitcase

Learn through this unique show and tell about students from Japan. This presentation uses actual

items as well as photos that illustrate the daily lives of Japanese children at home and in school.

 

 

Japanese Language

Beginner's lesson in pronunciation, greetings, numbers, and simple phrases. Discover how 

the Japanese and English languages are different.


Kimono

See how to properly wear a traditional Japanese garment and obi (belt) in this demonstration. We 

have some formal silk kimono, the casual cotton yukata, and the short happi coat. Programs may

include dressing participants for photo opportunities as time allows.

*Note - We do not usually lend out clothing

 

Mindfulness/Meditation

Learn how to calm your mental and emotional state using a form of Zen Buddhism meditation.


Music - Instrumental

Group performance of traditional and contemporary Japanese music, plus a few fun

American songs, with instruments such as the shamisen, koto, and jamisen/jabisen.

 


Music - Singing

Request an interactive performance in singing traditional and contemporary Japanese

songs.


Origami

Origami is the art of folding paper. This hands-on activity teaches individuals how to fold

origami papers into a variety of shapes. 

 


Taiko

Request an energetic drumming performance from St. Louis Osuwa Taiko. The shishi-mai lion

dance can be added for an audience-interaction attraction.


Top Spinning

See incredible skills at top spinning, ideal for outdoors or in areas with high ceilings. The 

top, koma, is a traditional toy in Japan.

 



**The following two activities are also offered on a monthly basis with fees.** 

To learn more about our recurring programs of Ikebana and Tea Ceremony (Chadō) please click here


Tea Ceremony (Chadō)

Chadō, or the Way of Tea, is a spiritual practice formalized by Sen no Rikyu in the 16th century. 

Presentations can be adapted to classroom settings or full demonstrations can be done in 

larger spaces. 


Ikebana

Ikebana is the Japanese art of flower arrangement that dates back to the 15th century. Ikebana 

emphasizes the natural beauty of flower materials including the stems and leaves, as well as the 

shapes, lines, and forms. It employs an asymmetric composition, space, and the principal of 

minimalism. Ikebana is also known as the way of flowers, involving the spiritual practice of 

understanding all living things in nature.

 


Please fill out the form below to request one of these activities! 



"Japan America Society of St. Louis" is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.
University of Missouri - St. Louis
362 SSB
1 University Boulevard
St. Louis MO 63121-4400

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